What to do if you’ve been denied entry to Canada at the US-Canada border due to a criminal conviction?

Introduction:

Crossing the US-Canada border is not always easy, especially if you have a criminal record. Even if you are a US citizen, you may be denied entry into Canada if you have a criminal conviction. This can be a frustrating and confusing situation, but there are steps you can take to address it. In this blog, we will discuss what to do if you have been denied entry to Canada at the US-Canada border due to a criminal conviction.

  1. Understand the Reasons for Your Denial:

The first step in addressing a denial of entry to Canada is to understand the reasons behind it. Canadian border officers have broad discretion when it comes to admitting individuals into the country, and they may deny entry to those who they believe pose a risk to Canadian society. If you have a criminal conviction, this may be the reason for your denial.

  1. Determine Your Inadmissibility Status:

If you have been denied entry to Canada due to a criminal conviction, it is likely that you are considered inadmissible to Canada. Inadmissibility means that you are not allowed to enter or remain in Canada due to reasons such as criminality, security, or health. Depending on the severity of your offense and how long ago it occurred, you may be eligible for rehabilitation or a temporary resident permit (TRP).

  1. Explore Your Options for Rehabilitation:

Rehabilitation is a legal process that can remove your inadmissibility status, allowing you to enter Canada without issue. The rehabilitation process involves demonstrating that you have been rehabilitated since the time of your conviction. The length of time required to be considered rehabilitated varies depending on the severity of the offense. For example, if you were convicted of a single non-serious offense more than 10 years ago, you may be deemed rehabilitated automatically. If you were convicted of a more serious offense, you may need to apply for individual rehabilitation.

  1. Consider Applying for a Temporary Resident Permit:

If you are not eligible for rehabilitation or if the process will take too long, you may be able to apply for a temporary resident permit (TRP). A TRP is a document that allows you to enter Canada for a specific purpose, such as to attend a business meeting or to visit family. The permit is usually valid for a short period, typically up to six months, and can be renewed if necessary.

  1. Seek Legal Assistance:

Navigating the Canadian immigration system can be challenging, especially if you have been denied entry to the country. If you have been denied entry to Canada due to a criminal conviction, it is essential to seek legal assistance. An experienced immigration lawyer can help you understand your options, guide you through the rehabilitation or TRP application process, and represent you in any legal proceedings.

Conclusion:

If you have been denied entry to Canada at the US-Canada border due to a criminal conviction, it can be a stressful and frustrating situation. However, there are steps you can take to address the issue. Understanding the reasons for your denial, determining your inadmissibility status, exploring your options for rehabilitation or a TRP, and seeking legal assistance can all help you overcome the obstacles and successfully enter Canada. Contact Falcon Law PC at 1-877-892-7778 or info@falconlawyers.ca for experienced and effective legal representation.

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